[time-nuts] metric / English

Lee Mushel herbert3 at centurytel.net
Sat Dec 17 23:27:27 EST 2011


You might want to consider the possibility that there is a whole world of 
manufacturing that does not deal with millions of a single item.   And 
prototypes are not part of the process.  When a product life might extend 
over ten years and you can expect to get orders for two or three per year 
(you know there are products  that cost tens of millions of dollars)  then 
high volume is of much less interest.   Of course, a single part might 
require a five axis machine and then things are again different.  I vividly 
recall one sales visit  when I was only 35 or 40, and still hadn't learned 
anything, and found that a very familiar product was still being 
manufactured in a room with a dirt floor.

Lee
----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Chuck Harris" <cfharris at erols.com>
To: "Discussion of precise time and frequency measurement" 
<time-nuts at febo.com>
Sent: Saturday, December 17, 2011 9:31 PM
Subject: Re: [time-nuts] metric / English


> The manual machines are still in use for limited production runs,
> such as are used in prototype manufacture.
>
> Screw machines, and second op lathes see extensive use in
> manufacturing because they are quicker than CNC machines...
> that and very cheap to use.
>
> I use manual machines because it is quicker to whittle out a prototype
> chassis or do-dad on manual machines than it is to do a formal
> CAD drawing, and then work out the tool paths to do it on a CNC
> machine... and then find you have made it a mistake... wash rinse
> repeat...  CNC machines are like printers.  In theory they save
> time and materials, but in practice, they can burn time and waste
> materials like no human running a manual machine ever would.
>
> [As a tree farmer, who sells trees into pulp production, computers
> and printers have been a godsend.  More trees go into paper
> production today then ever did before the advent of the "paperless"
> office.]
>
> -Chuck Harris
>
> Chris Albertson wrote:
>> On Sat, Dec 17, 2011 at 4:48 AM, Chuck Harris<cfharris at erols.com>  wrote:
>>> Which works very well, but unlike all of the English
>>> thread combinations, you must keep the lathe's half-nuts
>>> engaged to the lead screw ALWAYS.  That means when you reach
>>> the end of the thread, you must stop the lathe, and back
>>> it up to the beginning of the thread to make the next cut.
>>
>> That method always works.  But another might.  There will always be
>> some integer number of pitches that get you back exactly without
>> error.  But it might be say 5 inches back so there is almost always a
>> way to run only forward you method might be the best.
>>
>> But are people still using these old machines for production work?
>>
>>
>> Chris Albertson
>> Redondo Beach, California
>>
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