[time-nuts] eBay Giveaway Vectron OCXOs

jmfranke jmfranke at cox.net
Fri Dec 23 16:49:45 EST 2011


I tested a couple of the oscillators. The Reference Output Voltage does not 
plateau as the input voltage is increased. It does hit 3.00V for an input of 
3.3V. It is at 4.5V when the input is 5v and keeps climbing well past 5V as 
the input voltage is raised. So, it appears to be a simple 0.9 times the 
input voltage. One unit failed at 12V. At 3.3V, the initial current drain is 
0.45A for a net power of 1.48W and after a short time the current drops to 
0.16A for a net power of 0.53W. Both numbers are well below the maximum 
ratings, but typical ratings are not given and the rapid drop between the 
two plateaus indicates the oven controller is working fine.

So, my bet is placed on the devices being 3.3V.

John  WA4WDL
--------------------------------------------------
From: "Peter Gottlieb" <nerd at verizon.net>
Sent: Friday, December 23, 2011 2:57 PM
To: <time-nuts at febo.com>
Subject: Re: [time-nuts] eBay Giveaway Vectron OCXOs

> A search of the Vectron site for OCO500 (which is on my unit) brings up a 
> datasheet which references that as a "replaced" unit.
>
> http://www.vectron.com/products/ocxo/c4550.pdf
>
> Shows there are 5, 12 and 3.3 volt options.  I don't see where 4.8 volts 
> is a reference output voltage, the closest is 5 volts with the 12 volt 
> unit.  I would put the unit on a variable bench supply and slowly raise 
> the input voltage to see where the reference stops increasing but I would 
> hazard a guess that it is a 12 volt unit.  If you increase the supply to 
> 5.5 etc then in that case you would see the reference stop increasing at 
> 5.0.
>
> Peter
>
>
>
> On 12/23/2011 2:42 PM, Magnus Danielson wrote:
>> On 12/23/2011 08:26 PM, SAIDJACK at aol.com wrote:
>>> Running it at 5V with a Ref out at 4.8V would seem too close. Maybe it's 
>>> a
>>> 12V part?
>>>
>>> If nothing else this could be a very stable, ovenized 4.8V lab 
>>> reference
>>> source..
>>>
>>> Is anyone planning to monitor the aging/stability/noise of this 
>>> reference?
>>
>> My guess would be for 12 V, but 5V would be one to try.
>>
>> Measuring the frequency stability on 5V would be one thing to try.
>>
>> Cheers,
>> Magnus
>>
>>> bye,
>>> Said
>>>
>>>
>>> In a message dated 12/23/2011 07:28:34 Pacific Standard Time,
>>> danrae at verizon.net writes:
>>>
>>> Thanks  for all the responses.  A quick check before breakfast shows 
>>> that
>>> mine would seem to be for 5 Volts since the power consumption at that
>>> input agrees with the data sheet referenced; the current peaks at 0.95 A
>>> warming up and 0.13 A warm.   Reference V out is 4.8  V.
>>>
>>> Dan
>>>
>>>
>>> _______________________________________________
>>> time-nuts mailing list -- time-nuts at febo.com
>>> To unsubscribe, go to 
>>> https://www.febo.com/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/time-nuts
>>> and follow the instructions there.
>>
>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> time-nuts mailing list -- time-nuts at febo.com
>> To unsubscribe, go to 
>> https://www.febo.com/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/time-nuts
>> and follow the instructions there.
>>
>
> _______________________________________________
> time-nuts mailing list -- time-nuts at febo.com
> To unsubscribe, go to 
> https://www.febo.com/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/time-nuts
> and follow the instructions there.
> 





More information about the time-nuts mailing list