[time-nuts] Attila Kinali's Request for inductance information

fred47 at sprynet.com fred47 at sprynet.com
Fri Jun 26 19:48:20 EDT 2015


Long-time lurker here.

Attila, you might find the book "Inductance:  Loop and Partial" by Clayton Paul to be what you're looking for.

IEEE Press / Wiley
--Fred

>
> Message: 14
> Date: Fri, 26 Jun 2015 14:34:15 +0200
> From: Attila Kinali <attila at kinali.ch>
> To: Discussion of precise time and frequency measurement
> <time-nuts at febo.com>
> Subject: Re: [time-nuts] magnetic electronic components
> Message-ID: <20150626143415.202ea02460c2cb4b21294922 at kinali.ch>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8
>
> Moin!
>
> Thanks for all the answers and sorry for my late reply.
> I tried to at least skim trough the suggestions before.
>
> I would like to reply in one big mail instead of many small
> ones, in order not to clutter the mailinglist too much.
>
> On Tue, 23 Jun 2015 00:15:29 +0100
> Adrian Godwin <artgodwin at gmail.com> wrote:
>
> > Although it's published by a vendor, this applications manual has a lot of
> > useful information.
> >
> > http://www.we-online.com/web/en/electronic_components/produkte_pb/fachbuecher/Trilogie.php
>
> Even though, I do not own a copy of The Trilogy, I know of it.
> It does a good job of covering the basics. But unfortunately, it
> does not contain much about the theoretical background, so does
> not help much in understanding how to work around the physical limits
> of cores. Other than that, I would recommend this book to every practicioning
> electrical engineer.
>
> On Mon, 22 Jun 2015 18:56:02 -0500
> Bob kb8tq <kb8tq at n1k.org> wrote:
>
> > You have two choices:
> >
> > 1) Read the physics stuff
> > 2) Go back far enough that the divide had not occurred ( <= 1950’s).
> >
> > Sorry about that ….
>
> Yes. I came to a similar conclusion. What irks me is, that this is
> the conclusion I came to with many topics in electrical engineering.
> At some point people decide that it is either too difficult to deal with
> or a solved problem and ignore it completely from then on. And if you
> are an engineer who tries to actually understand things instead of just
> repeating what some senior engineer told you long long ago, then you
> run up against walls. :-(
>
> On Mon, 22 Jun 2015 20:24:14 -0700
> Jim Lux <jimlux at earthlink.net> wrote:
>
> > the best, and probably the only, book is the one by E.C. Snelling.
> > http://www.amazon.com/Soft-ferrites-properties-applications-Snelling/dp/0592027902
> >
> > 1969 edition is
> > https://archive.org/details/SNELLING__SOFT-FERRITES__1969
> >
> > and it's not like the properties of magnetic fields have changed.
>
> Cool! Thanks a lot! I was looking for this, but couldn't find it.
> I somehow missed that archive.org had a copy.
>
> On Tue, 23 Jun 2015 07:25:57 -0400
> Tim Shoppa <tshoppa at gmail.com> wrote:
>
> > Here in the USA, iron powder and ferrite cores of many different materials,
> > sizes, and a few shapes are available from Amidon and kitsandparts.com.
> > Many useful ferrite cores for multi-turn transformers and chokes, are sold
> > as "EMI beads" by Mouser and Newark and other mainline distributors. I
> > don't know too much about easy availability in EU.
>
> Buying cores is not much of a problem. For one there are the distributors
> you have mentioned, for another we have companies like Würth here in
> Germany and Coilcraft in the US who are no afraid of selling single pieces
> (if they dont just regard it as samples).
>
> BTW: I really like to work with Würth. I know very few components companies
> that go so much out of their way to help a struggling engineer to get his
> project done. And they never ask about the volume of your project. You need
> help, you get help.
>
>
> Thanks for all the replies and suggesttion. And sorry if I don't answer all
> of them individually.
>
> Attila Kinali



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