[time-nuts] 10 MHz -> 16 MHz

Magnus Danielson magnus at rubidium.dyndns.org
Wed Oct 3 09:52:13 EDT 2018


Hi Brian,

The typical ones have two amplifier chains in parallel and one mixer.
You take the output from the amplifier branch of your liking.

The hard part is to tune them to run in synchronous mode and ensure they
stay there, or else there is a beat pattern causing excessive jitter
over that of the synchronous mode.

Cheers,
Magnus

On 10/3/18 1:54 PM, Brian, WA1ZMS wrote:
> Bruce-
> 
> Does such a dual conjugate regen divider use a single mixer with the BPFs in parallel?   Or are there multiple loops?  I'm trying to visualize the topology.
> 
> I've built a few divide-by-2 regen dividers (both worked very well) but nothing else.
> 
> -Brian
> 
> 
>> On Sep 30, 2018, at 4:25 PM, Bruce Griffiths <bruce.griffiths at xtra.co.nz> wrote:
>>
>> A low phase noise method is to use a dual conjugate regenerative divider with 6MHz and 16Mhz bandpass filters in the feedback loop to produce 16Mhz output.
>>
>> For 12MHz output use 2MHz and 12MHz bandpass filters in the feedback loop. 
>>
>> Bruce
>>> On 01 October 2018 at 09:05 Bob kb8tq <kb8tq at n1k.org> wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>> Hi
>>>
>>> If (as originally specified) noise and jitter are not a big deal - there are a lot 
>>> of chips out there like the ICS570. They are designed to do weird ratio frequency
>>> conversions so 10 to 12 or 10 to 16 are trivial for them. The Clockblock board was
>>> one way to get it all put together. 
>>>
>>> Bob
>>>
>>>> On Sep 30, 2018, at 12:05 PM, Gerhard Hoffmann <dk4xp at arcor.de> wrote:
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>> Am 30.09.2018 um 16:49 schrieb Attila Kinali:
>>>>>
>>>>> The simplest way I can think of is the following:
>>>>> Use a 74LV8154 to divide the 10MHz down to 152.587890625Hz.
>>>>> Use the capture timer unit of the uC to measure the phase of the
>>>>> pulse. Use any kind of DAC (internal, external, PWM,...) to steer
>>>>> the 16MHz VCO. Depending on how fast the timer unit runs, this
>>>>> will give you something in the order of 10-200ns dead-band.
>>>>> By choosing the right frequency for the timer unit, one can
>>>>> get it to "dither" a bit and then use averaging.
>>>>>
>>>>> For lower jitter, use one half of a Nutt interpolator
>>>>> to get the timing difference between the 152Hz signal
>>>>> and the 16MHz (ie similar to what the SRS FS740 does).
>>>>> Use something akin Nick Sayer's time-to-amplitude converter
>>>>> for the fine measurement.
>>>>>
>>>>> Same works equally well for 12MHz.
>>>>>
>>>>>
> 
> 
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