[time-nuts] Lots of Off Topic discussion,

Pete Lancashire pete at petelancashire.com
Tue Sep 4 17:48:06 EDT 2018


One way I like to put it is like you when I start it in ham radio I
immediately considered WWV as the answer to everything TimeWise.

But for me around about 1975 I worked at General Electric space flight
systems. One could say I became a Time nuts then and discovered that what I
thought what is a Accurate Way of determining how much in error I was
between NBS and my clock Waze and amount that was totally useless to
anybody else other than maybe a ham and someone that owned a watch.

So I went from 1/100th to at least at work 1/10000000000 and now today that
is considered totally useless. Put about 20 zeros and you're getting closer.

The only way to put it is the world has changed

On Tue, Sep 4, 2018, 7:15 AM Scott McGrath <scmcgrath at gmail.com> wrote:

> Hi Joe
>
> Like myself you are not a RECENT ham.  Your first radio like mine was
> probably a Heathkit with Glassfet technology.   Like me you learned how to
> use WWV to set clocks and your VFO accurately
>
> Fast forward to the ‘current’ generation of hams.  Most have been licensed
> 15 years or less.   They are interested in SDR, digital modes,  ‘The World
> Above 50 Mhz’ and to a lesser extent coherent CW.   This generation ‘knows’
> WWV as a question in the exam pool and they never met W2NSD.
>
> This is the generation of hams who DONT use WWV.   At many large tech
> companies you would be surprised at the number of hams but most of them
> don’t advertise the fact as I’dont because of the undeserved reputation of
> hams being behind the technology curve.   But everyone is gaga because i
> have a GROL+RADAR+GMDSS maintainer.
>
> Content by Scott
> Typos by Siri
>
> On Sep 1, 2018, at 8:12 PM, Joe Hobart <nova at npgcable.com> wrote:
>
> Scott McGrath
>
> I am an amateur radio operator (62 years), and I have accurate 1 PPS and
> 10 MHz
> available.  I also coordinate emergency communications for this very large
> county.
>
> I use WWV:
>
>   To judge propagation during normal and other than normal times
>
>   To set clocks after a power outage
>
>   To calibrate relatively new amateur radio transceivers (not Collins)
>
>   To set my computer clock to better than 1/10 second for FT8 digital mode
> and
> when I was recovering faint asteroids that were in danger of being lost
>
> It is easy to set clocks within 1/10 second while watching the digital
> display
> and listening to the WWV/WWVH tics.  I tend to get the wrong second when I
> use a
> GPS clock.
>
> Best,
> Joe Hobart
>
> _______________________________________________
> time-nuts mailing list -- time-nuts at lists.febo.com
> To unsubscribe, go to
> http://lists.febo.com/mailman/listinfo/time-nuts_lists.febo.com
> and follow the instructions there.
>
> _______________________________________________
> time-nuts mailing list -- time-nuts at lists.febo.com
> To unsubscribe, go to
> http://lists.febo.com/mailman/listinfo/time-nuts_lists.febo.com
> and follow the instructions there.
>


More information about the time-nuts mailing list